Tea Houses

You might be surprised at what you would label “luxury” after long hours on steep and rocky trails.

I give you the term for this… a Nepalese tea house.

There were no trucks bringing building supplies to these remote villages.  If it’s there, it came on the back of a man or a yak (or a woman or a child).

And yet – here we slept in rooms with mattress pads, glass windows, slide bolts on the doors, huge and fluffy blankets. 

Even more unbelievable, sometimes we had our own sink and toilet.  Other times we still felt fortunate to share a toilet and sink with our fellow trekkers.

The small tea houses were my favorites, of course.  A “bed and breakfast” really.  Here a family would look after our team, cook us delicious meals, give us a fire in the wood & yak dung burning stove in the middle of our dining room.

Those dining rooms are charming.  Views of almost indescribable beauty.  Book cases with sweet accent pieces of lovely dishes.  Cushioned seats along the walls with pretty little tables for our hot tea and meals.

Ginger tea, lemon tea, mint tea – these will forever remind me of my time on this journey.  I am determined to plant mint in my rose beds next spring.  Then I’ll pluck the fresh leaves, steep them in hot water, and I’ll be transported back to these high Himalayan villages and these wonderful tea houses.

Post Script – I wrote all that around 12,000 feet.  Around 16,000 feet – as I was breaking ice out of a bucket with a rusty old can so I could “flush” the squatty potty, I changed the luxury status to “accommodating”.

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3 Responses to “Tea Houses”

  1. Kim says:

    What a grand adventure! You should write a guide book for the tour company 🙂

  2. Sandy says:

    Thanks, Kim. One of these days a travel magazine is going to read my blog and hire me to go around the world… writing about my adventures! Hee hee!

  3. Nico Francis says:

    A little perspective when one considers your blog! “There were no trucks bringing building supplies to these remote villages. If it’s there, it came on the back of a man or a yak (or a woman or a child).”

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